Mad Men Season Five Finale Thoughts

  • Even after watching all of season five, I’m still not sure if I grasp this image.  Maybe it’s just Don taking a good long reflective look at his life and how comfortable he has become (pajamas) and wondering if he’s really happy.
  • It was a bit low key for a season finale, wasn’t it?  But hey, it was still good and all.
  • I’m glad the firm is going to get a second floor, I never liked that boardroom.  I have a feeling in the first episode of next season we’ll see renamed Sterling Cooper Draper Campbell.
  • Peggy looking out that window and seeing those two dogs humping is representative of a lot she has seen in her line of work.  I wonder how you get dogs to do that on command.
  • A visual list of all the women that have been Drapered.
  • Even though the ending is left to interpretation, I think Don became weak and gave into temptation with all the challenges he’s been facing, especially with Lane’s death and all the thoughts about his late brother Adam’s similar death.  I think it just weighed on him two folks hung themselves because of his lack of compassion, and he turned to his old ways to try to find an escape.
  • That tooth ache was pretty symbolic . . . a pain that won’t to away . . . you can avoid it all you wish until you finally confront your fear, even though Don didn’t think so as he said, “It’ll go away. It always does.” In this case, it was the dentist that was unavoidable, but I’m not sure what Don really has to confront imagery wise, perhaps his responsibility in the deaths of Lane and Adam or not being the competitive Don we are use to seeing?
  • I forgot that back in season one we see Adam getting a glimpse of what he thought was Dick Whitman as his brother’s body was brought home on a train.  Now, it’s Don thinking he saw a glimpse of what he thought was his dead brother.  Things come full circle, eh?
  • The death benefit SCDP received from Lane’s death was $175,000.  Using the inflation calculator and the year 1967, today that’s worth $1,205,535.18.
  • Matthew Weiner sure did toy with us and lead us on with that brief nudity warning at the beginning of the episode.  Which makes me think, can you think how crazy this show would be on HBO without commercials or having to worry about the FCC.
  • Weiner also did a great job of teasing us to think that Sally’s friend Glenn was the one calling and not speaking when Meghan picked up the phone.  Oh, those were the days before caller ID.
  • What of the odds of Roger dying of autoerotic-asphyxiation after an LSD trip?
  • Peter’s line “I’m going to have the same view as you, Don” sure did make me wonder if that was more symbolic.  After all, he’s pulling a lot of acts we’ve seen Don do earlier in the series, just not as smoothly or desperately.
  • Fresh Lifesavers?  Come on Peter, you can think of something better than that.  But dang, that was a funny line.
  • Pete isn’t going to need to ride that train anymore, since Trudy relented into letting him get an apartment in the city.  I bet we just see Pete lonely and sulking in there most of the time.  In case you are wondering, it takes Pete about an hour and a half to ride the train home.
  • The actor that plays Pete is brilliant at bringing out his creepiness and desperation for respect.
  • I feel pretty strongly that John Slattery is going to win an Emmy for his work this season.
  • There’s hope we’ll continue to see Peggy on and off.
  • When I look at these two pictures of Betty and Meghan, I can’t help but think Don still doesn’t know what he wants.
  • And the best insight on the season finale is provided by the cast below, well worth watching.  Heck, I didn’t realize that Lane’s name wasn’t mentioned once last night.

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