McDonald’s 365Black

McDonald’s likes Black people . . .


At McDonald’s®, we believe that African-American culture and achievement should be celebrated 365 days a year — not just during Black History Month. That’s the idea behind It’s a place where you can learn more about education, employment, career advancement and entrepreneurship opportunities, and meet real people whose lives have been touched by McDonald’s. Plus, you can also have a chance to win exciting once-in-a-lifetime opportunities. So make sure you visit often — you just might get inspired.

Like the unique African Baobab tree, which nourishes its community with its leaves and fruit, McDonald’s has branched out to the African-American community nourishing it with valuable programs and opportunities.

Just for the heck of it, I tried and nothing came up, but I did find that the URL is available.

In somewhat related news, I recently discovered from the Library of Congress that May is Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month:

May is Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month-a celebration of Asians and Pacific Islanders in the United States. A rather broad term, Asian/Pacific encompasses all of the Asian continent and the Pacific islands of Melanesia (New Guinea, New Caledonia, Vanuatu, Fiji and the Solomon Islands), Micronesia (Marianas, Guam, Wake Island, Palau, Marshall Islands, Kiribati, Nauru and the Federated States of Micronesia) and Polynesia (New Zealand, Hawaiian Islands, Rotuma, Midway Islands, Samoa, American Samoa, Tonga, Tuvalu, Cook Islands, French Polynesia and Easter Island).

Like most commemorative months, Asian/Pacific Heritage Month originated in a congressional bill. In June 1977, Reps. Frank Horton of New York and Norman Y. Mineta of California introduced a House resolution that called upon the president to proclaim the first ten days of May as Asian/Pacific Heritage Week. The following month, senators Daniel Inouye and Spark Matsunaga introduced a similar bill in the Senate. Both were passed. On October 5, 1978, President Jimmy Carter signed a Joint Resolution designating the annual celebration. Twelve years later, President George H.W. Bush signed an extension making the week-long celebration into a month-long celebration. In 1992, the official designation of May as Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month was signed into law.

The month of May was chosen to commemorate the immigration of the first Japanese to the United States on May 7, 1843, and to mark the anniversary of the completion of the transcontinental railroad on May 10, 1869. The majority of the workers who laid the tracks were Chinese immigrants.

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One Response to McDonald’s 365Black

  1. Doodie says:

    Doodie on Thu, 27th Aug 2009 8:27 pm

    Good post. But, 365Black is ridiculous. I think this is one of those things that we’re all going to look back on and say “I can’t believe they thought like that!”

    “Like the African Baobab Tree, which nourishes the community with it’s leaves and fruit, McDonald’s has branched out to the African-American community nourishing it with valuable programs and opportunities.”

    Can someone please tell me what a Baobab tree has to do with culture and life in the United States?

    And how many people of African decent have ever eaten Baobab fruit or even know what the hell a Baobab Tree is? I feel bad for the actual Africans being nourished be this tree if it’s fruit is compared to McDonald’s food. Does the Baobab Tree clog arteries and rob the body of essential vitamins and nutrients too?

    Not to mention, the girl in the in the video is easily less than 50% recent African decent anyway. The whole concept is retarded. wrote something up about it as well.

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